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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the u.s. military? we'll get an update from the region and talk with two of the senate's most influencial voices on foreign policy, john mccain and joe lieberman. and healthcare reform one year later. we will ask our sunday group what is the long-term prognosis for the president's signature legislation. all, right now on "fox news sunday." and hello again from fox news in washington. before we talk with our guests, we want to bring you the latest on events in the middle east. in syria, government soldiers have been deployed around the cities that have seen the biggest protests. in yemen, talks for a peaceful transfer of power failed saturday. now, authorities worry about al-qaeda gaining strength in that country. and in libya, bombing by u.s. and allied planes has paveed the way for rebel forces to retake the key oil town. for more on libya let's bring in fox news correspondent steve harrigan in tripoli. >> a rapid advance for the rebels. moving quickly toward what they say is an eventual battle here in tripoli. they have taken the key town of ajdabiya. the air strikes have ta
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mars and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to ma
of people in london. dozens of u.s. allies that at least one libyan opposition leader. she discussed the coalition's goals for ending the not war. >> to urge qaddafi to implement a real cease-fire that is not going to be immediately breached by his own forces. to withdraw from those areas that he has taken by force. and to look for a political resolution which could include his leaving the country. >> shepard: this comes as a senior u.s. officials tells fox news that qaddafi's inner circle shows signs of, quote, cracking with some of his most trusted advisors questioning whether he can survive. that official also tells us that morale among the libyan troops is low. but the situation on the ground in the not war does not reflect that over the past 24 hours, colonel qaddafi's forces have made significant gains against the rebel fighters. those rebels advanced quickly over the last couple days qaddafi's hometown of sirte. rockets forced them to double back today, retreat. this despite the coalition firing 22 tomahawk missiles at a cost of $33 million. and flying more than 100 air strike
? and in japan nuclear chaos. tonight, how the newest trouble forced workers and the u.s. navy to clear the area. first from fox this monday night, the desperation tactics of muammar qaddafi. we are seeing new evidence that the dictator is using human shields to keep international coalition to keep from hitting key targets. this as america unleashes fireplace in yet another conflict in the middle east. this, the scene over tripoli just hours ago as antiaircraft fire streak through the night's sky, searching for any coalition aircraft. allied military leaders have been working to establish a no-fly zone over libya. in an effort to prevent qaddafi from attacking his own people. commanders are also targeting libyan troops who threaten civilians they tell us. we are told war planes focused a lot of their fireplace near the eastern city of benghazi, carrier jets reportedly dropped at least 12 bombs there overnight. >> and through a variety of reports, we know that regime ground forces that were in the vicinity of benghazi now possess little will or capability to resume offensive operations. >> u.s. a
establish the no-fly zone and suppress his air defences. >> reporter: the secretaries also made clear u.s. policy that moammar qaddafi must go is not the aim of the current mission. >> one of the things that i think is central is you don't, in a military campaign, set as a mission or a goal something you're not sure you can achieve. >> reporter: the critics on capitol hill say the administration's policy lacks clarity. >> i think there should have been a plan for what our objectives were, a debate as to why this was in our vital interest before we committed military forces to libya rd today nato assumed full command of the mission. the president says america's role will be limited. >> we're not putting any ground forces into libya. >> reporter: and that other union heaveal in the middle east like the recent bloody crack down in syria will be looked at case by case. >> each of these, we are looking at and an liz will-- analyzing carefully. but we can't draw some general, sweeping conclusions about the entire region. >> reporter: and president obama makes his pitch monday evening in a telev
>> couric: tonight, the u.s. uses a warplane as the allies keep up the assault on libya and qaddafi remains defiant. >> (translated): we win. we will be victorious in this historical battle. we will not surrender. >> couric: i'm katie couric. also tonight, they survived one disaster, now these japanese have been forced to take shelter against another threat-- nuclear radiation. america's nuclear problem. where to store permanently more than 145 million pounds of spent fuel rods. and college students struggling to make the grade. what some schools are doing to make sure they graduate. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. it's four days into a u.s.-led assault on his military, and libya's moammar qaddafi has lost radar installations, tanks, and naval facilities but not his defiance. he appeared in public tonight in tripoli vowing to fight on and telling supporters he will win and will not surrendered. qaddafi's forces kept up their attacks on civilians today in a n
patrolling off libya's coast, this as the u.s. gets ready to hand over control of the no fly zone to the alliance. whatever that alliance is. we don't know at this time. in the meantime pro car davi forces ratchet up attacks in an eastern city of that country, stopping rebel groups there, but the international air strikes continue and now we have reports that those attacks forced pro qaddafi forces to withdraw tanks from another rebel-held city in the west. a whole lot goes on there today, jon. jon: the libyan leader remains as defiant as ever, appearing from his compound in tripoli and vowing to win the historic battle. now there's word, though, that mommar qaddafi may be planning his exit strategy. secretary of state hillary clinton, weighing in on that on abc's "world news with diane sawyer". >> this is what we hear from so many sources, diane, it is a constanto. >> today? >> today, yesterday, the day before. some of it, i'll be very, you know -- it's my personal opinion -- some of it is theater. a lot of it is just the way he bee haves. it's somewhat unpredictable. but some of
. scuba diving. bill: not new jersey. martha: they are getting out of the u.s., not new jersey. we'll be right back tomorrow, same time same place, see you then. jon: right now breaking developments and brand-new stories this hour. the attack on libya. a ferocious era salt to enforce the no-fly zone and qaddafi's compound among the targets. smoke rises from two damaged reactors. radiation detected in the count three's food and water supply. the 9/11 trials at guantanamo bay, what the lawyers that are set to try the cases are selling faction. how they believe the obama administration may be working to keep these cases out of gitmo. all new, all live "happening now." and good morning to you i'm jon scott. jenna: i'm jenna lee. we're so glad you are with us. we are here in the fox newsroom. happening right now we have a fox news alert out of libya. the u.s. navy releasing grand new video of the punishing nighttime assaults on qaddafi forces. they are using b.-2 stealth bombers, jet fighters and tom hawk missiles. jon: qaddhafi's forces come under fire across the count three. the secur
will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
site and take our non-scientific "you decide" poll. should the u.s. go after moammar qaddafi? 14% of you have say yes. you can still weigh in. bill: we have a fox news alert. police on the scene at the airport. a suspicious package located near one of the baggage carousels. not quite sure what's in it if anything. police say they do not think it's related to what we saw last night. did you see this ranging fire last night? look at these pictures. this is at the airport in miami. the fire breaking out in the area where the fuel is kept. it was not near a runway or terminal. this morning there could be flight delays because the airport is running at 40% fuel capacity. look at the night skylight up in miami. we are giving you a live report at the airport to find out what happened at the fire and also what's going on with this suspicious package. >> tense moments in the sky as two passenger flights are forced to land without help from anyone in the airport control tower. it happened at reagan national airport just across the river from our nation's capitol. take a listen as the contr
, hezbollah bullah. it is also a font for regional instability. both in iraq and against u.s. forces there quite frankly syria matters a lot. and libya doesn't matter quite as much, nearly as much. >> shepard: unlike syria, has no plans for actions in syria. in fact, there is a different leader in syria now. many of the members in congress of both parties who have gone to syria in recent months have said they believe he's a reformer "the fox report" chontd jonathan hunt in our newsroom. assaad a reformer? >> there are many syrians, many middle east experts and many on capitol hill who would laugh at the very idea of president assaad as a reformer. among those, senator jon kyl, the republican whip who said in a statement today and i quote, how many more syrians must president assaad murder or assault before secretary of state clinton no longer endorses the notion that is he a reformer. of course, secretary clinton was actually referring to the view of members of congress, not her own personal view. president assaad is probably better thought of as a northern nicener an economic sense.
on innocents here in the u.s. when will the government learn? from new york, defending freedom every night of the week, so long america! >> gregg: tripoli under attack right now. i'm gregg jarrett. a new round of air strikes by the international coalition and we're getting reports that air-raid sirens and explosions are being heard across the libyan capital and on calm's hometown. let's go right to steve harrigan. steve, what can you tell us. >> reporter: in the last few minutes we heard eight loud incoming ex pleogsz to the east of the city of tripoli. clearly audible. one round of three strikes, another round of five. we're not seeing the anti-aircraft fire that usually goes up. a remarkable shift in the battlefield. we are seeing the rebels advance quickly. they have taken four towns previously retreated. brega and one other. it's really being coalition powered that has paved the way targeting gadhafi forces and personnel carriers so the rebels have been able to advance so far without much of a fight. the government officials here say gadhafi forces are making a strategic retreat but it
on intelligence operations and had been careful to what president obama had said publicly that no u.s. ground troops will be sent into libya. but, u.s. officials say there are small cia teams on the ground in eastern libya trying to fair ret out who are the leaders of the opposition? what are their motivations? what do they want for libya. said to be a special. there have been cia operatives in benghazi. when that f-15 jet went down last week and the two pilots ejected. we know one of them ended up in benghazi and some u.s. undercover agents were able to get him out of the country. shep? >> shepard: without some sort of help, it's widely believed or further help i should say it's widely belief these rebels trying to overthrow the government can't win. new debate in washington whether to give those rebels weapons. how is that going? >> that's a tough question, because some military leaders have said they have seen, quote, flickers of al qaeda involvement with the rebels and clearly nobody at the white house or no lawmaker on capitol hill wants to arm a terrorist. the white house said today tha
: international forces attack muammar qaddafi's military. u.s. and coalition fighters flying more than 150 air anythings over north africa nation and firing 16 cruise missiles in the past 24 hours according to a spokesman after nato agreed last night to assume command of the no-fly zone. but united states and other allied forces are in charm of the rest of the world in including attacks on the ground forces which is the toughest part of the operation and the most controversial. the quick exit does not appear likely and now steve harrigan in the libyan capital but first over to the pentagon. the transition of command is happening. what does it mean? >> we are told from a senior nato official it is being transitioned and it will take 72 hours before general ham can hand over to the nato command structure and the new lieutenant general, the canadian lieutenant general is put in charge of the no-fly zone. the enforcement of the no-fly zone will still be robust. this is not going to just be planes looking for aircraft in the sky. it will be a robust enforcement of the no-fly zone. listen to investi
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
for the u.s. in the battle against al qaeda and several hundred loyalists, still scattered around yemen, back country and, seizure of that weapons plant is a blow in that fight. president obama is preparing to address the situation in libya tomorrow night and his decision to intervene has been criticized from both sides of the aisle, some say it came too late. others argue, we shouldn't be involved at all and the president defending his move, saying this weekend it this our national interest. what does the president need to say to get the country on board. david drucker joins us from "roll call", to say it is in our national interest, that is a stretch? >> i don't think it is a stretch but the president has to forcefully and clearly make the case, i think the problem he has had is he did not address the nation on television the moment we went into libya on that saturday and this is something the emerging market have some to expect from presidents -- >> gregg: he's doing it under pressure now. >> i don't know if that is it or, in his mind now is the time. one of the problems the presiden
, and what u.s., nato and allied roles will be, we talked to senators john mccain and jack reed. >> there are times where the greatest nation in the world and the strong eh nation in the world has to act alone, that is not the preference, and the preference is to build coalitions as we have most of the times in the past. i think that president obama may be unintentionally or intentionally conveying the impression that we can never act alone. i don't think that is appropriate, given possible scenarios. >> as we have seen, this trance formative effect in egypt and tunisia, i can't we want to encourage that but we want to recognize it is best done through a coalition, it is best done by using the particularly unique capabilities of the united states, but not committing our forces to long-term engagements. >> and david ignatius of the washington post, david ignatius, doyle mcmanus and julianna goldman. >> it is exhilarating seeing for people calling for change and sweeping away governments and yet where it is going, what the risks are for the united states, nobody knows, and i think
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
is a highly developed country. it is as technologically sophisticated as us, and there's much concern in the u.s. that a similar accident can occur here. how do you respond to that concern? >> well, first, i would agree with you. the reactor in chernobyl was of a different design. it was-- it had point of instability. it had no containment vessel. but we are looking very carefully at what is naepg japan because, as you say, they're using more advanced designs. a number of reactors in the united states have similar designs, and we're going to look at what went wrong in terms of the double-barreled whammy this huge, hung earthquake and huge su, and look to our reactors again and learn as much as we can so we can, if needed, improve the safety. by "if needed" what i really mean is we're always increasing the safety of our reactors, and not only our reactors but the safety of all our industrial systems. >> mr. secretary, two days ago a number of us wrote to chairman upton, whitfield, and stearns, asking our committee here investigate and hold hearings about the safety and prepared understandness of
in the u.s. >>> a killer whale that drowned its trainer, one year ago, today, he is back in the show at sea world. some are asking if it's too soon, or even safe at all. it's all new, all live. it's "happening now". jon: good morning to you! i'm jon scott. jenna: hi everybody, i'm jenna lee. nice to have you back, jon. >>> "happening now", major setbacks in the rebels in libya, proqaddafi forces forcing them to retreat from a key oil town. it's a big story, jon. jon: it's a rapid reversal coming days after the opposition made gains west and trying to take over qaddafi's home town. nato war planes flying over the zones with the heaviest fighting, witnesses reporting hearing explosions indicating a new round of air strikes. jenna: all the chaos is affecting the oil industry. that is the industry in libya. we have word today that only one refinery is still functioning. there are now fears of a fuel shortage in libya. how that fight affect the fight. and also what that means for the rest of the world so dependent on oil now. rick leventhal is traveling to benghazi now, he's going to call us in
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military baby civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing: s
decades. >> a massive fire at a u.s. major airport, flames raging for hours, the fallout, plus the investigation into what sparked it. >>> and donald trump with his eye on the presidential prize. does he stand a chance? for real? it's all new, all live, it's french fighter jets take action shooting the libyan war plane out of the sky. jenna: as a new round of strikes hits target necessary tripoli, jet bombers and tom hawkmisms from the coalition target qaddafi air defense. jon: rebel forces making real progress now that qaddafi's tanks have pulled back from key strategic cities, the opposition taking more steps to form a government in the east. rick leventhal is streaming live from benghazi. what can you tell us about qaddafi possibly negotiating an exit plan, rick? >> reporter: well, we heard that libra's more than fr called the u.s. assistant secretary of state over the state -- over the weekend to possibly discuss what qaddafi's exit strategy might be. it's pairnl very preliminary, these calls are made all the time is what we're hearing but there may have been a call made fr
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)